Gutenberg is Coming. Are You Ready?

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If you've been paying even the slightest bit of attention to the WordPress community and upcoming WordPress development, you've probably heard of Gutenberg. If not, it's something you'll certainly want to be aware of.

The Gutenberg project will undoubtedly change how everyone who uses WordPress interacts with content. Looking forward, there's a high possibility that it will change publishing as a whole, impacting even those outside of WordPress.

What is Gutenberg?

Gutenberg is major WordPress project that will allow users to build content using blocks, rather than the standard post editor that they're accustomed to. This means that the publishing process is more like placing individual items on a page, rather than textual content mixed with shortcodes for a much more pleasant experience.

Currently, Gutenberg is a standalone plugin for WordPress, but will soon be merged into WordPress core with WordPress 5.0. That means that everyone running WordPress, as of version 5.0, will see the familiar post editor replaced with the shiny new Gutenberg editor.

So What's the Big Deal?

Because content is built with blocks rather than with text and shortcodes, the editing experience will be a lot more like a visual page builder than an editor.

Here's what people are saying:

There's a ton of chatter online about Gutenberg, and for good reason: Gutenberg is imminent and will shape WordPress for years to come.

Everyone, regardless of their level of interaction with WordPress, will be impacted by Gutenberg. Plugin authors, theme builders, writers, editors, and even small business owners operating their own website will need to adapt to the new experiences provided by Gutenberg.

Evolving the WordPress Plugin Landscape

Not only is Gutenberg is changing the editing experience, but it'll also change how WordPress plugins are used and developed. With such a large change to how publishing is done, plugins that interact with the post editor will need to adapt their code to be compatible with Gutenberg. This usually means ensuring that either their existing shortcodes are compatible, or switch to containing their content within a block.

Either way, there's bound to be required changes across many of the plugins out there if they want to stay on the radar. Older plugins without at least a small amount of maintenance being performed will likely have some issues, even if minor ones.

Of course, developers who fully embrace Gutenberg will be at a huge advantage. Thanks to Gutenberg, plugins will have more flexibility than ever before. Supporting those plugins for users will be easier as well, due to the ease of adding a block instead of a shortcode.

Not only will dedicated plugin developers have better control and a better interface at their disposal, but their well-crafted Gutenberg blocks will stand out from others that may not have fully adopted the new editor.

The pressure to be Gutenberg-compatible will likely benefit users the most. By migrating many of the plugin user interfaces over to Gutenberg blocks, the need to jump between plugin settings pages and the post editor will be lessened or eliminated entirely.

The Future of Gravity Forms + Gutenberg

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We've been watching Gutenberg closely since it's initial inception. Gravity Forms was created over 8 years ago to make forms easier to build while providing a familiar interface that feels like native WordPress. Thanks to Gutenberg, we have more tools at our disposal to make that happen.

Recently, we released our first Gutenberg block into beta as an add-on and will soon integrate it into the main Gravity Forms plugin when Gutenberg is released. Even as simple as the block we released is, it shows how truly powerful Gutenberg is when it comes to user interfaces. Instead of clicking the Add Form button above the editor to place a shortcode the page, a form can be placed just like any other content by simply adding a block.

Here at Gravity Forms, we've fully committed to Gutenberg. Not only are we developing several blocks to enhance user experience inside the Gutenberg editor, but we're also working hard to further Gutenberg as a whole. We want to see Gutenberg become the absolute best it can be, which is why we've directly dedicated our own resources to contribute to the Gutenberg project.

How You Can Help

So now you're excited about Gutenberg and want to know how you can help the project? Awesome!

The biggest need right now is for everyone to test Gutenberg. Any software, no matter how great, is bound to have a few bugs. The more testing that is done to find bugs, the more stable it will be when WordPress 5.0 rolls around. As an added bonus, testing Gutenberg before it launches will ensure that your site is stable as well. It's a win-win.

If you're ready to test Gutenberg, you can install it as a plugin right now. While you're at it, be sure to install the Gravity Forms Gutenberg add-on as well. We'd love to hear your feedback.

Rather squash a few bugs? Check out the Gutenberg repo on GitHub, grab an issue, and submit a pull request!

If you have any comments or questions, be sure to drop us a comment below.

Gravity Forms Gutenberg Add-On v1.0 Beta 1 Released

Gravity Forms Gutenberg v1.0 Beta 1 is now available on the Downloads page.

This first release provides a new Gravity Forms block for the upcoming overhaul to the WordPress post editor (codenamed Gutenberg). The block lets you to easily embed a Gravity Forms form into a page or post, with access to all the standard embedding options.

As the most advanced form builder, we're committed to providing the most advanced integration with WordPress and Gutenberg. A live preview of your form will appear as you make changes to the block settings. The Gravity Forms block also includes our powerful Conditional Logic, allowing you to show or hide the form based on the current time, the user's logged in state and the current user's WordPress role.

In future beta releases, we'll be integrating more deeply with Gutenberg. There will be blocks available for our various Add-Ons including a Login Form block for the User Registration Add-On and a block to easily display results on your post for the Polls Add-On.

The Gravity Forms team is committed to the Gutenberg project, both by helping our customers migration to the new editor be as simple as possible and helping with the Gutenberg codebase itself. (We've already had a few pull requests merged.) It's important to try Gutenberg as early as possible to understand how this new editor will affect your content management workflow.

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Gravity Forms v2.3 RC 4 released

Gravity Forms v2.3 Release Candidate 4 is now available via the downloads page. It is only available via automatic update if you have previously installed a Gravity Forms v2.3 Beta. Version 2.3 is a feature release that includes a variety of enhancements and improvements. A complete rundown of the features, enhancements, and changes can be found below.
This is the first time Gravity Forms has ever made such a major change to the database schema so we want to ensure that every site is upgraded successfully without any loss of entry data. To avoid potential issues we advise all customers to test this version before the final release and report any issues.
Now is the time for 3rd party developers and customers who have implemented customizations that may be impacted by these changes to be testing and readying changes in preparation for the final release of Gravity Forms v2.3 via automatic update. read more

Collecting Repeatable Data in WordPress Forms

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Collecting repeatable data is a frequent need when building WordPress forms. Whether you're registering players for a team, recording employees working for a company, or purchasing multiple configurable products on a single checkout form you'll need a way to collect repeatable data.

In this article, we'll show you an effortless way to obtain and work with repeatable data and fields by utilizing Gravity Forms and the 3rd-party plugin, GF Nested Forms by Gravity Wiz.

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Our Commitment To Accessibility and Why It’s Important

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Over the years, Gravity Forms has increasingly committed to making your WordPress forms accessible to the widest audience possible. Partnering with accessibility experts within the WordPress community such as Amanda Rush has allowed us to ensure that forms created with Gravity Forms are compatible with accessibility tools such as screen readers.

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Gravity Forms v2.3 RC3 Released

Gravity Forms v2.3 Release Candidate 3 is now available via the downloads page. It is only available via automatic update if you have previously installed a Gravity Forms v2.3 Beta. Version 2.3 is a feature release that includes a variety of enhancements and improvements. A complete rundown of the features, enhancements, and changes can be found below.
This is the first time Gravity Forms has ever made such a major change to the database schema so we want to ensure that every site is upgraded successfully without any loss of entry data. To avoid potential issues we advise all customers to test this version before the final release and report any issues.
Now is the time for 3rd party developers and customers who have implemented customizations that may be impacted by these changes to be testing and readying changes in preparation for the final release of Gravity Forms v2.3 via automatic update. read more

Gravity Forms v2.3 Add-On Compatibility Updates

The release of Gravity Forms v2.3 is fast approaching and we have released updates to several Gravity Forms Add-Ons in preparation for this release.

The following add-ons have been updated for compatibility with the database schema changes that will be coming in the next major Gravity Forms release: Authorize.Net, Partial Entries, PayPal Payments Standard, PayPal Payments Pro, Signature, and User Registration.

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Creating, Displaying, and Editing Team Member Profiles

Each form on your website provides you with the ability for people to interact and submit information from the front-end, but there are some situations where the submitted information needs to be visible from the front-end and sometimes edited.

A common use for this is with user profile pages. Information that a user submitted 5 years ago can sometimes become invalid and in need of editing. Instead of digging through form entries inside the WordPress admin, allowing the user to directly edit their own entry is a far easier solution.

In this article, we'll show you how to edit Gravity Forms entries from a page on the front of your website, and how to enable your users to edit their own entries without even granting them access to the WordPress dashboard!

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Creating WordPress User Registration and Login Forms

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Handling user registration and login within your WordPress sites can sometimes be a complex task, and WordPress doesn't make it terribly easy without a lot of effort. Creating user registration and login widgets from scratch can take quite a bit of development time and testing. Thankfully, other solutions exist which require minimal, if any, custom development.

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Supercharge your WordPress Forms with 1,000+ Apps and Services

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There's no doubt that Gravity Forms officially supports more 3rd-party services than any other WordPress form plugin. The ability to connect your forms to your unique workflow is absolutely critical to your business' success. By making it easy for you to connect your forms to a multitude services such as MailChimp, PayPal, and Zapier, Gravity Forms is able to adapt to your needs without the need for complex setup or development.

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